Is Homework Necessary? | Too Much Homework Is Bad for Kids | Live Science

 

bad homework

May 22,  · There you have it, five reasons why homework is bad for your child. A number of studies have found that homework negatively affect the life of school children in many ways. Free-time plays a major role in fostering creativity and emotional development — factors as important to long-term success as education capsreviewq.ml: Peter Druker. Here are some reasons why homework is good and why it's bad. Why Homework Is Good. Here are 10 reasons why homework is good, especially for the sciences, such as chemistry: Doing homework teaches you how to learn on your own and work independently. You'll learn how to use resources such as texts, libraries, and the internet. Aug 22,  · Research shows that some students regularly receive higher amounts of homework than experts recommend, which may cause stress and negative health effects. Share on Author: Sandra Levy.


Is Homework Good or Bad for Kids?


Peace, harmony, bad homework, and lifelong learning are Liz's passions. She's outspoken on education and childhood and is an activist in local politics. No doubt I will take some flak for the ideas presented in this article. No, I am not a teacher, but I have dealt with a lot of teachers in my day. Of course, I am a teacher in many senses of the word: I've taught my children how to speak and other early-childhood lessons; I've taught Girl Scout workshops to both kids and adults; and I've taught various skills to several persons at various times.

I know my position is unpopular with many people; by the same token, there are many others who will agree with me. Depending upon the school in question, bad homework, children can be subjected to homework as early as kindergarten, and certainly this burden has been imposed on every child by the third grade, bad homework. By the time school is out, the kids just want to go home, relax, and be a kid!

It is the rare child who enjoys homework, and whose parents do not wage battles of one degree or another over the subject. Typically, the child will arrive home, have a snack, bad homework, possibly a short play break, and then be sat down to do their homework, bad homework. I doubt there are many parents who will not agree that this can be a traumatic time. The child has already been exercising his or her brain all day at school. They need time to digest the material, not do busy work at home.

Busy work, you say? Yes, that is exactly what homework is. Especially the sort of homework that involves copying out questions already printed bad homework the textbook. This is a waste of time, paper, and face it, bad homework, a cause of frustration, extra tiredness and sloppy penmanship, bad homework. Little hands tire and cramp up easily. Bad homework you regard school as a child's "job," and compare to jobs held by adults, you will soon realize that there are not very many jobs that require the employees to take work home and continue to work on their own time.

The teaching profession is one of the exceptions, but they can reduce or eliminate their own "homework" load by not assigning homework to their students! Look at all the extra paperwork and 'correcting' that would eliminate! There is another even more practical reason for eliminating bad homework. The common argument in favor is that the homework is intended to reinforce the day's lessons. That's a nice theory, but it is something of a straw man defense, bad homework.

If the lesson was presented well, and the student understood it, bad homework will remember it. Class time should be allotted for practice. If the lesson was not understood, bad homework, then what bad homework at homework time? The student is lost, has no idea of the concept, and will practice and reinforce bad homework instead.

I hear the response to this suggestion already! The student should ask if bad homework does not understand! But there are extenuating circumstances. In the fourth grade, I had one such horrible teacher, bad homework. He had zero patience, and held the opinion that asking questions meant you had not paid attention, bad homework. His "answer" to any student's legitimate question was to severely scold that child, including slamming and breaking pointers and rulers across the student's desk.

The fellow's face would get beet red, he'd be yelling at the top of his voice, and the entire class was intimidated. I coped by trying very hard to be invisible. That was a crucial year for learning the foundations for advanced math later on; fractions, percents, long division, etc. Thanks to this teacher, I failed to master any of it, and to this day, I struggle with math. Another nice idea, freely tossed about, is that parents should help their children with the homework.

This is a nice theory, but parents, especially today, often are both working, and the evenings are chaotic with all the tasks related to running the household, getting dinner, and getting kids to bed on time. Since they have worked all day, they are tired. Asking them to sit and often do battle with the kids to get the homework done is an added stress they bad homework not need. Besides, they've already "done their time" in school, paid their dues.

Parents are the first teachers their children have, when it comes to learning bad homework talk, bad homework, tie their shoes bad homework brush their teeth. When it comes time for schooling, however, bad homework, the majority send the little moppets off to school, bad homework. Of course parents should, offer any help requested about lessons the child has studied in school, and be supportive of learning in general bad homework a lifelong process.

But help with actual homework? There are simply too many opportunities for strife and too few for positive ends. Homeschooling families are still a small fraction of the educational experience, bad homework. As I often said when I bad homework going through this battle with my own children, "I send them to school to learn, bad homework. I'm not a teacher--I don't have the temperament for it. Additionally, many parents have no idea of today's teaching methods. Just look at the so-called "new math" craze that was being taught in the 's and 's.

Most of us had no clue what in the world this was about--it was a totally foreign concept of how to teach. Many parents I knew could not decipher this strange new way of complicating simple addition and subtraction.

It was not only my particular math deficit--other parents not so "mathematically challenged" as I had similar difficulties. I recently saw a page of math my granddaughter had been assigned. It had my head spinning, bad homework. It seems there is now a new craze out there, bad homework, in which countless additional and unnecessary steps are added to simple addition problems. This is foolishness of the highest order, bad homework. It not only wastes time and creates frustration and more of a learning gap with students and parents, but it also presents multiple opportunities for mistakes to be made.

My point being, teaching methods keep changing, and we parents and grandparents, many years since out of school, have not had reason not being teachers ourselves to keep abreast of the bad homework educational fads and theories.

This makes helping the current generation bad homework at bad homework, and fuels the fires of frustration on both sides. I hated homework when I was a child, and I vividly recall many battles with my poor mother over the issue. I even have an accidentally self-inflicted tattoo on my leg when in a fit of bad homework over one of those fourth-grade math problems I flung my freshly sharpened pencil to the floor. Unfortunately, it never made it to the bad homework, and stuck into my leg instead, bad homework.

Lesson learned: don't throw temper tantrums. Lesson not learned : how to do the math problems! To this day, some sixty years later, see photo below I still bear the mark! I hated homework to the point that it made me hate school. Raised in a somewhat more strict household than many of today's bad homework, I was 'terrified' of getting a failing grade, so I did not totally slack off.

However, I developed the attitude of "If a "C" bad homework passing, why bust my tail for anything higher? When my own children came along, I was very torn between insisting that they do their homework, and the fact that I did not support the concept in any way. To attempt to take a "devil's advocate" position, I offer studies on the other side of the coin. One such set of arguments can be found at the 'Teachnology' site. They also follow with arguments supporting my premise.

This article in Newsweek also claims in its title that homework is a good thing. However, read through to the end, bad homework, and we find that the studies are actually inconclusive. I have seen my elder grandson struggle with getting it done. He and my daughter have waged battles royale over the topic. He's not a dummy--in fact, he's very smart, and figures out a lot on his own. Without ever having taken advanced math perhaps elementary algebrahe went online and found trigonometric formulas, understood them, bad homework, and applied them in designing model rockets for his hobby.

This same boy is bad homework studying Gaelic bad homework, on his own time, and learning this ancient language--just for fun! Imagine where this could take him! All of this tells me that his refusal to do his homework to the point of getting bumped out of 'regular' school into continuation school meant that he was bored with it.

He was one of those who understood bad homework class, bad homework, and did not see the point of wasting his "off time" with more of the same. A reading assignment can be done in class--it need not be sent home, bad homework. What is wrong with a quiet reading time in school? The teacher can use this time to do some of her required paperwork, thus lessening or eliminating her own "homework" burden! Perhaps, bad homework, to eliminate homework, one more hour might need to be added to the school day.

So what? The payoff would be of far greater benefit than the ritual of homework, bad homework. When my eldest granddaughter was in third grade, she battled her mother my other daughterover the same thing. She dawdled, got distracted, took breaks, made excuses, goofed off, squirmed, and generally took over 2 hours to do half an hour's worth of work. Because she had already sat still all day long in class! She was tired and wanted to play and recharge her batteries! I did not fault her at all.

The reason for my grandson's lackluster performance and dismissal from 'regular' high school was almost exclusively due to failure to turn in homework assignments. Sometimes, he'd even do them.

 

Why Homework is Bad: Stress and Consequences

 

bad homework

 

Here are some reasons why homework is good and why it's bad. Why Homework Is Good. Here are 10 reasons why homework is good, especially for the sciences, such as chemistry: Doing homework teaches you how to learn on your own and work independently. You'll learn how to use resources such as texts, libraries, and the internet. May 22,  · There you have it, five reasons why homework is bad for your child. A number of studies have found that homework negatively affect the life of school children in many ways. Free-time plays a major role in fostering creativity and emotional development — factors as important to long-term success as education capsreviewq.ml: Peter Druker. Live Science is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more Too Much Homework Is Bad for KidsAuthor: Natalie Wolchover.